Medical Gas Professional Healthcare Organization

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Zone Valve Box / Outlets

  • Friday, August 31, 2018 9:00 AM
    Message # 6647940
    Al Moon (Administrator)

    A hospital has a oxygen zone valve box that controls 10 patient rooms.


    They are going into rooms 6,7,8,9,&10. and remove the front primary latches.

    Then install a blank cover over the oxygen outlet. This oxygen outlet will still be live with only the secondary check.


    Questions:


    1) Is their any code, standard or documentation covering this type work ?


    2) how would you label the zone valve box ?



    Last modified: Friday, August 31, 2018 9:01 AM | Al Moon (Administrator)
  • Saturday, September 01, 2018 6:36 PM
    Reply # 6649804 on 6647940

      They need to cut and cap the gas lines that go to those nonactive rooms. 

    NFPA 99 2018 5.1.5.1  each station outlet/inlet for medical gases or vacuums shall be gas specific, whether the outlet/inlet is threaded or it is non-interchangeable quick coupler. 

     If you take the faceplate off that makes it gas specific it is in violation of the code. 

    Last modified: Saturday, September 01, 2018 7:11 PM | Don Holden
  • Saturday, September 01, 2018 11:07 PM
    Reply # 6650018 on 6647940

    5.1.6.8 Manufactured assemblies employing hose or flexible connectors, where the station outlet/ inlet attached to the piping is not fully and immediately accessible (i.e., cannot be manipulated without the removal of panels, doors, and so forth), shall have station outlets/ inlets with the following additional characteristics:

    (1) They shall be gas-specific connections with positive locking mechanisms that ensure the connector is firmly seated and cannot detach without intentional actuation of the release (e.g., D.I.S.S. connectors).

  • Saturday, September 01, 2018 11:28 PM
    Reply # 6650024 on 6647940

     5.1.3.5.2 Permitted Locations for Medical Gases. Central supply systems for oxygen, medical air, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and all other patient medical gases shall be piped only to medical gas outlets complying with 5.1.5, into areas where the gases will be used under the direction of licensed medical professionals for purposes congruent with the following:

    (1) Direct respiration by patients

  • Sunday, September 02, 2018 1:22 PM
    Reply # 6650483 on 6649804
    Cary Darden (Administrator)
    Don Holden wrote:

      They need to cut and cap the gas lines that go to those nonactive rooms. 

    NFPA 99 2018 5.1.5.1  each station outlet/inlet for medical gases or vacuums shall be gas specific, whether the outlet/inlet is threaded or it is non-interchangeable quick coupler. 

     If you take the faceplate off that makes it gas specific it is in violation of the code. 

    I believe most rough are pin indexed so the pins of an oxygen latch valve wouldn’t fit into a nitrous oxide rough in.
  • Sunday, September 02, 2018 1:24 PM
    Reply # 6650485 on 6647940
    Cary Darden (Administrator)

    I do not think NFPA 99 addresses this directly, so why not throw it back to the facility to do a risk assessment with the departments this will impact and get their answer that way?

  • Monday, September 03, 2018 10:05 AM
    Reply # 6651427 on 6647940

     Hiding in the outlet potential hides a leak. 

     NFPA states that all outlets/inlets need to be tested annually. How would you test those outlets? 

  • Tuesday, September 04, 2018 3:23 AM
    Reply # 6652405 on 6651427
    Cary Darden (Administrator)
    Don Holden wrote:

     Hiding in the outlet potential hides a leak. 

     NFPA states that all outlets/inlets need to be tested annually. How would you test those outlets? 


    I do not know of anywhere within NFPA 99 that states outlets / inlets need to be tested annually.  There is a section in the annex (A5.1.15 I believe) that mentions annual testing.  I believe the wording used in 5.1.14 is "periodic".  

  • Tuesday, September 04, 2018 6:24 AM
    Reply # 6652569 on 6647940

    Cary, you are correct - the "annual for outlets" is a facility specific item, not mandated anywhere.

     

    Nor does anyone, anywhere, talk to intentional abandonment of a system.  

     

    So I agree with Don that removal is the "Right" answer.  There are so many problems that hidden outlets raise which can't really be answered (leakage, decay with time, backflow/contamination if the valve is closed and the pressure leaks away, opening by the curious/malicious, misuse)

     

    That is the advice I would give the facility.  

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