Medical Gas Professional Healthcare Organization

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STARDARD AND NON-STANDARD MEDICAL GAS OUTLETS

  • Wednesday, October 31, 2018 12:47 PM
    Message # 6882766
    Al Moon (Administrator)

    A 100 BED HOSPITAL HAS ALL DISS OXYGEN OUTLETS.


    THE PRESURE FOR THESE DISS OXYGEN OUTLETS IS 53 PSIG.


    THE HOSIPTAL WHATS TO ADD NON-STANDARD OXYGEN OUTLETS AT 83 PSIG.


    ? HOW WOULD YOU DO THIS AND STILL MEET NFPA 99 2012, 2015 & 2018 ?


    I LOVE THIS BOOK 

  • Thursday, November 01, 2018 11:44 AM
    Reply # 6884296 on 6882766

    Hi Al

    As far as I know, this use or characteristics for Station outlets still the same on 2012-2015 and 2018 versions


    NFPA 99-2018

    3.3.162 Semipermanent Connection. A noninterchangeable connection, usually a D.I.S.S. connector, which is the termination of the pipeline and that is intended to be detached only for service. It is not the point at which the user makes connections or disconnections. (PIP)


    If we see this paragraph on definitions, all the station outlets were the medical staff make connections and disconnection should be quick connector station outlets, and mostly of the hospitals have this configuration for the outlets, quick connection for the ones on the wall and DISS for the ones on the ceiling , however this not stablish any were on the code.


    What it is said on the code is that the outlets that work above 80 psi should be D.I.S.S


    5.1.5.15 Station outlets in systems having nonstandard operating pressures shall meet the following additional requirements:

     (3) If operated at a pressure in excess of 550 kPa (80 psi), they shall be either D.I.S.S. connectors or comply with 5.1.5.15(4).


    The only requirement for these DISS outlets that will work at a pressure of 83 psi is the one regarding the nonstandard pressure labeling.


    5.1.11.3.2 Where medical gas systems operate at pressures other than the standard gauge pressure of 345 kPa to 380 kPa (50 psi to 55 psi) or a gauge pressure of 1100 kPa to 1275 kPa (160 psi to 185 psi) for nitrogen, the station outlet identification shall include the nonstandard operating pressure in addition to the name of the gas.


    Therefore, I believe that the old 53-psi station outlets one and the new ones with the nonstandard pressure labeling on them meet the code  



  • Thursday, November 01, 2018 11:52 AM
    Reply # 6884319 on 6882766

     I would labeled the non-standard operating pressure outlet’s appropriately. 

  • Thursday, November 01, 2018 12:18 PM
    Reply # 6884352 on 6882766

     Example: What is the difference between a DISS medical Air and a DISS dental air? 

  • Friday, November 02, 2018 7:04 AM
    Reply # 6885380 on 6882766
    Al Moon (Administrator)

    I understand both your comments and though the same.

    But after reading the section 4 more times ( mostly part #2 ).

    I would debate that per part #2.

    This 100 bed with all Oxygen DISS Outlets at 53 psig - can not have a non-standard Oxygen Outlet at 83 psig with a DISS connection.




    5.1.5.15  Station outlets in systems having nonstandard operating pressures shall meet the following additional requirements: 


    (1) They shall be gas-specific.


    (2) They shall be pressure-specific where a single gas is piped at more than one operating pressure [e.g., a station outlet for oxygen at 550 kPa (80 psi) shall not accept an adapter for oxygen at 345 kPa (50 psi)].


    (3) If operated at a pressure in excess of 550 kPa (80 psi), they shall be either D.I.S.S. connectors or comply with 5.1.5.15(4).


    (4) If operated at a gauge pressure between 1380 kPa and 2070 kPa (200 psi and 300 psi), the station outlet shall be designed so as to prevent the removal of the adapter until the pressure has been relieved to prevent the adapter injuring the user or others when removed from the outlet.



    NOW AS FOR DON'S QUESTION:

    CONCERNING A MEDICAL AIR DISS VS DENTAL AIR DISS.

    I WOULD ALSO ASK THE NEXT QUESTION.

    WHAT DOES AN ASSE 6030 MEDICAL GAS VERSIFIER, DO WHEN HE SEES:

    A DISS IA OUTLET ( INSTRUMENTATION AIR )  IN A CLEAN SCOPE AND THIS OUTLET IS NOT SUPPLIED BY N.F.P.A. 99-2002 EDITION - IA ( INSTRUMENTATION AIR ) COMPLIANT SOURCE SYSTEM?


    Last modified: Saturday, November 03, 2018 8:34 AM | Al Moon (Administrator)
  • Monday, November 05, 2018 5:51 AM
    Reply # 6889312 on 6882766

    In my opinion, the 6030 must put this on the report as a deficiency.  The Instrument Air terminal unit is intended for use on an instrument air system as defined under NFPA 99, and it should not be used with just any pipeline / source. 

     

    So, I would argue that the use of the Instrument Air terminal outlet attracts the other requirements, and if that does not suit the facility they should use a non-specific terminal (e.g. a gas turret) or the like, with a distinct designation - "equipment air", "scope air", "non medical air", etc. and should look to the general purpose air requirements in Chapter 8.3.5. 

     

    That is of course only an opinon, and I hasten to confess that this is not black and white in the standard.

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