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Vacuum for Labs but not Scope Cleaning Rooms?

  • Wednesday, March 24, 2021 3:08 PM
    Message # 10231796
    Steve Bradshaw (Administrator)

    2021 Codes

    5.1.3.7.5.1 Piping arrangement shall be as follows:

    (3) Where only one set of vacuum pumps is available for a combined medical–surgical vacuum system and an analysis, a research, or a teaching laboratory vacuum system, such laboratories shall be connected separately from the medical–surgical system directly to the receiver tank through its own isolation valve and fluid trap located at the receiver, and between the isolation valve and fluid trap, a scrubber shall be permitted to be installed.

    5.1.14.1.4* The medical–surgical vacuum and WAGD systems shall not be used for nonmedical applications (e.g., vacuum steam condensate return).


    Proposed 2024 Code:

    5.1.14.1.4* Medical–surgical vacuum and WAGD systems are permitted to also be used for nonmedical applications if in compliance with 5.1.3.7.5.1(3), and also sized to accommodate the additional volume.


    Reason for change:

    Liquids used in a scope cleaning room may not be any more harmful to the vacuum system than those used in a teaching laboratory.


    Last modified: Friday, March 26, 2021 1:24 AM | Steve Bradshaw (Administrator)
  • Thursday, March 25, 2021 3:02 PM
    Reply # 10235203 on 10231796

    As long as there is a separate receiver and fluid trap before going into the medical vacuum system I do not have a problem with it. If you do not have a separate piping system going down to the medical vacuum then the fluid trap and receiver tank must be placed prior to connecting to the medical vacuum line. 

  • Friday, March 26, 2021 7:10 AM
    Reply # 10237228 on 10231796
    Al Moon (Administrator)

    IN MY OPINION


    NFPA 99 2021 Codes ( THE LISTED IN MOST ALL THE PAST CODES )


    Section #5.1.3.7.5.1 Piping arrangement shall be as follows:


    (3) Where only one set of vacuum pumps is available for a combined medical–surgical vacuum system and an analysis, a research, or a teaching laboratory vacuum system, such laboratories shall be connected separately from the medical–surgical system directly to the receiver tank through its own isolation valve and fluid trap located at the receiver, and between the isolation valve and fluid trap, a scrubber shall be permitted to be installed.


    Section #5.1.14.1.4* The medical–surgical vacuum and WAGD systems shall not be used for nonmedical applications (e.g., vacuum steam condensate return).

     

    To me its clear and understandable.


    The major problem is the location Section #5.1.14.1.4.

    Its listed way in the back of Chapter #5 - So its missed by the Design Team and Hospital Staff. ( also missed by a large number of verifiers or perhaps ignored )


    I suggest, a simple comment listed within Section #5.1.3.7.5.1 to review Section #5.1.14.1.4, is all that is needed:


  • Friday, March 26, 2021 8:19 AM
    Reply # 10237363 on 10231796
    Steve Bradshaw (Administrator)

    I'm suggesting changing the code to allow vacuum inlets to be used in non-medical areas (e.g. scope cleaning rooms) because those chemicals are probably no worse than lab chemicals.


    The inlet would have to be piped directly to the receiver with a valve and fluid trap just like is allowed for a vacuum inlet in a lab.  The pump would also have to be sized to handle the additional demand.


    Possibly its not a good idea to allow either inlets in labs or scope cleaning rooms, but I don't think one is worse than the other. 

  • Saturday, March 27, 2021 12:39 PM
    Reply # 10241920 on 10231796
    Al Moon (Administrator)

    Again If This Section Is In Place For Patient Safety!

    Medical / Surgical Vacuum Systems Need The Same Verbal.


    ( not just removing the wording OK for non-medical use )


    5.1.3.5.2  Permitted Locations for Medical Gases. Central supply systems and medical gas outlets for oxygen, medical air, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and all other patient medical gases shall be piped only into areas where the gases will be used under the direction of licensed medical professionals for purposes congruent with the following: 

    (1) Direct respiration by patients

    (2) Clinical application of the gas to a patient, such as the use of an insufflator to inject carbon dioxide into patient body cavities during laparoscopic surgery and carbon dioxide used to purge heart-lung machine blood flow ways

    (3) Medical device applications directly related to respiration

    (4) Power for medical devices used directly on patients

    (5) Calibration of medical devices intended for (1) through (4) 

    5.1.3.5.3  Support Gases. Central supply systems for support gases shall not be piped to, or used for, any purpose except medical support application.


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